China high quality Low Noise 100lpm 400W Small Piston Vacuum Pump for Vacuum Filtering vacuum pump belt

Product Description

Product Parameter

ITEM NO

GLE550A2

Name

Oil free vacuum pump

Packing

2 pcs / carton case , 54 pcs / pallet

Weight

9.0 kg

Dimension

  240*113*200 mm

Installation size

  89*203 mm (4*M6)

Technical Specification

Voltage : According to your requirements ;
Vacuum flow : 
100 L/min @-92Kpa : (One-Grade vacuum) 
50 L/min @-98Kpa :(Two-Grade vacuum)
Power: 400 W ;
Noise : ≤51dB(A) ;
Speed: 1440rpm / 1700rpm ; 
Temperature : -5ºC-40ºC 

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After-sales Service: on Line Support and Free Spare Parts
Warranty: Two Years
Lubrication Style: Oil-free
Vacuum Flow: 100 L/Min @-92kpa : (One-Grade Vacuum)
Noise: ≤51dB(a)
Brand Name: OEM
Samples:
US$ 65/Piece
1 Piece(Min.Order)

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Customization:
Available

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vacuum pump

What Is the Vacuum Level and How Is It Measured in Vacuum Pumps?

The vacuum level refers to the degree of pressure below atmospheric pressure in a vacuum system. It indicates the level of “emptiness” or the absence of gas molecules in the system. Here’s a detailed explanation of vacuum level measurement in vacuum pumps:

Vacuum level is typically measured using pressure units that represent the difference between the pressure in the vacuum system and atmospheric pressure. The most common unit of measurement for vacuum level is the Pascal (Pa), which is the SI unit. Other commonly used units include Torr, millibar (mbar), and inches of mercury (inHg).

Vacuum pumps are equipped with pressure sensors or gauges that measure the pressure within the vacuum system. These gauges are specifically designed to measure the low pressures encountered in vacuum applications. There are several types of pressure gauges used for measuring vacuum levels:

1. Pirani Gauge: Pirani gauges operate based on the thermal conductivity of gases. They consist of a heated element exposed to the vacuum environment. As gas molecules collide with the heated element, they transfer heat away, causing a change in temperature. By measuring the change in temperature, the pressure can be inferred, allowing the determination of the vacuum level.

2. Thermocouple Gauge: Thermocouple gauges utilize the thermal conductivity of gases similar to Pirani gauges. They consist of two dissimilar metal wires joined together, forming a thermocouple. As gas molecules collide with the thermocouple, they cause a temperature difference between the wires, generating a voltage. The voltage is proportional to the pressure and can be calibrated to provide a reading of the vacuum level.

3. Capacitance Manometer: Capacitance manometers measure pressure by detecting the change in capacitance between two electrodes caused by the deflection of a flexible diaphragm. As the pressure in the vacuum system changes, the diaphragm moves, altering the capacitance and providing a measurement of the vacuum level.

4. Ionization Gauge: Ionization gauges operate by ionizing gas molecules in the vacuum system and measuring the resulting electrical current. The ion current is proportional to the pressure, allowing the determination of the vacuum level. There are different types of ionization gauges, such as hot cathode, cold cathode, and Bayard-Alpert gauges.

5. Baratron Gauge: Baratron gauges utilize the principle of capacitance manometry but with a different design. They consist of a pressure-sensing diaphragm separated by a small gap from a reference electrode. The pressure difference between the vacuum system and the reference electrode causes the diaphragm to deflect, changing the capacitance and providing a measurement of the vacuum level.

It’s important to note that different types of vacuum pumps may have different pressure ranges and may require specific pressure gauges suitable for their operating conditions. Additionally, vacuum pumps are often equipped with multiple gauges to provide information about the pressure at different stages of the pumping process or in different parts of the system.

In summary, vacuum level refers to the pressure below atmospheric pressure in a vacuum system. It is measured using pressure gauges specifically designed for low-pressure environments. Common types of pressure gauges used in vacuum pumps include Pirani gauges, thermocouple gauges, capacitance manometers, ionization gauges, and Baratron gauges.

\vacuum pump

Can Vacuum Pumps Be Used for Leak Detection?

Yes, vacuum pumps can be used for leak detection purposes. Here’s a detailed explanation:

Leak detection is a critical task in various industries, including manufacturing, automotive, aerospace, and HVAC. It involves identifying and locating leaks in a system or component that may result in the loss of fluids, gases, or pressure. Vacuum pumps can play a significant role in leak detection processes by creating a low-pressure environment and facilitating the detection of leaks through various methods.

Here are some ways in which vacuum pumps can be used for leak detection:

1. Vacuum Decay Method: The vacuum decay method is a common technique used for leak detection. It involves creating a vacuum in a sealed system or component using a vacuum pump and monitoring the pressure change over time. If there is a leak present, the pressure will gradually increase due to the ingress of air or gas. By measuring the rate of pressure rise, the location and size of the leak can be estimated. Vacuum pumps are used to evacuate the system and establish the initial vacuum required for the test.

2. Bubble Testing: Bubble testing is a simple and visual method for detecting leaks. In this method, the component or system being tested is pressurized with a gas, and then immersed in a liquid, typically soapy water. If there is a leak, the gas escaping from the component will form bubbles in the liquid, indicating the presence and location of the leak. Vacuum pumps can be used to create a pressure differential that forces gas out of the leak, making it easier to detect the bubbles.

3. Helium Leak Detection: Helium leak detection is a highly sensitive method used to locate extremely small leaks. Helium, being a small atom, can easily penetrate small openings and leaks. In this method, the system or component is pressurized with helium gas, and a vacuum pump is used to evacuate the surrounding area. A helium leak detector is then used to sniff or scan the area for the presence of helium, indicating the location of the leak. Vacuum pumps are essential for creating the low-pressure environment required for this method and ensuring accurate detection.

4. Pressure Change Testing: Vacuum pumps can also be used in pressure change testing for leak detection. This method involves pressurizing a system or component and then isolating it from the pressure source. The pressure is monitored over time, and any significant pressure drop indicates the presence of a leak. Vacuum pumps can be used to evacuate the system after pressurization, returning it to atmospheric pressure for comparison or retesting.

5. Mass Spectrometer Leak Detection: Mass spectrometer leak detection is a highly sensitive and precise method used to identify and quantify leaks. It involves introducing a tracer gas, usually helium, into the system or component being tested. A vacuum pump is used to evacuate the surrounding area, and a mass spectrometer is employed to analyze the gas samples for the presence of the tracer gas. This method allows for accurate detection and quantification of leaks down to very low levels. Vacuum pumps are crucial for creating the necessary vacuum conditions and ensuring reliable results.

In summary, vacuum pumps can be effectively used for leak detection purposes. They facilitate various leak detection methods such as vacuum decay, bubble testing, helium leak detection, pressure change testing, and mass spectrometer leak detection. Vacuum pumps create the required low-pressure environment, assist in evacuating the system or component being tested, and enable accurate and reliable leak detection. The choice of vacuum pump depends on the specific requirements of the leak detection method and the sensitivity needed for the application.

vacuum pump

What Is a Vacuum Pump, and How Does It Work?

A vacuum pump is a mechanical device used to create and maintain a vacuum or low-pressure environment within a closed system. Here’s a detailed explanation:

A vacuum pump operates on the principle of removing gas molecules from a sealed chamber, reducing the pressure inside the chamber to create a vacuum. The pump accomplishes this through various mechanisms and techniques, depending on the specific type of vacuum pump. Here are the basic steps involved in the operation of a vacuum pump:

1. Sealed Chamber:

The vacuum pump is connected to a sealed chamber or system from which air or gas molecules need to be evacuated. The chamber can be a container, a pipeline, or any other enclosed space.

2. Inlet and Outlet:

The vacuum pump has an inlet and an outlet. The inlet is connected to the sealed chamber, while the outlet may be vented to the atmosphere or connected to a collection system to capture or release the evacuated gas.

3. Mechanical Action:

The vacuum pump creates a mechanical action that removes gas molecules from the chamber. Different types of vacuum pumps use various mechanisms for this purpose:

– Positive Displacement Pumps: These pumps physically trap gas molecules and remove them from the chamber. Examples include rotary vane pumps, piston pumps, and diaphragm pumps.

– Momentum Transfer Pumps: These pumps use high-speed jets or rotating blades to transfer momentum to gas molecules, pushing them out of the chamber. Examples include turbomolecular pumps and diffusion pumps.

– Entrapment Pumps: These pumps capture gas molecules by adsorbing or condensing them on surfaces or in materials within the pump. Cryogenic pumps and ion pumps are examples of entrainment pumps.

4. Gas Evacuation:

As the vacuum pump operates, it creates a pressure differential between the chamber and the pump. This pressure differential causes gas molecules to move from the chamber to the pump’s inlet.

5. Exhaust or Collection:

Once the gas molecules are removed from the chamber, they are either exhausted into the atmosphere or collected and processed further, depending on the specific application.

6. Pressure Control:

Vacuum pumps often incorporate pressure control mechanisms to maintain the desired level of vacuum within the chamber. These mechanisms can include valves, regulators, or feedback systems that adjust the pump’s operation to achieve the desired pressure range.

7. Monitoring and Safety:

Vacuum pump systems may include sensors, gauges, or indicators to monitor the pressure levels, temperature, or other parameters. Safety features such as pressure relief valves or interlocks may also be included to protect the system and operators from overpressure or other hazardous conditions.

It’s important to note that different types of vacuum pumps have varying levels of vacuum they can achieve and are suitable for different pressure ranges and applications. The choice of vacuum pump depends on factors such as the required vacuum level, gas composition, pumping speed, and the specific application’s requirements.

In summary, a vacuum pump is a device that removes gas molecules from a sealed chamber, creating a vacuum or low-pressure environment. The pump accomplishes this through mechanical actions, such as positive displacement, momentum transfer, or entrapment. By creating a pressure differential, the pump evacuates gas from the chamber, and the gas is either exhausted or collected. Vacuum pumps play a crucial role in various industries, including manufacturing, research, and scientific applications.

China high quality Low Noise 100lpm 400W Small Piston Vacuum Pump for Vacuum Filtering   vacuum pump belt	China high quality Low Noise 100lpm 400W Small Piston Vacuum Pump for Vacuum Filtering   vacuum pump belt
editor by CX 2023-12-23